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    R A N C H   &   R O D E O   H O R S E S
     
    Dr. Ben Green said in one of his books, that
“the horse business is a disease…learn enough so
that it doesn’t bankrupt you financially or morally.”
     
   

Dr. Ron Ford, aka “Doc”, came to Lemmon, SD in 1967 after completing his enlistment in the Air Force and started Lemmon Veterinary Clinic in 1968. In 1970, he established Ford Ranch and started buying roan and gray fillies; developing a band of mares that has consisted of anywhere from one to 40 at any given time since.

In 1972 Ford Ranch purchased its first stud, Kelly Cody, and four outstanding gray mares (from Willard Schnell) that still influence the breeding program today. Kelly Cody had the best disposition of any horse owned to date and was an outstanding rodeo horse. In 1979, from April through August, John Baltezore earned 85 AQHA points on him. During his performance career Kelly Cody earned his Superior in Team Roping, ROM in Calf Roping and had points in reining and pleasure. He finished 6th in the Nation in Team Roping and qualified in three events for the World Show. His colts were big and flashy; going to the barn to see his new colts was like Christmas morning every time!

Also in 1972 the First Annual Ford Quarter Horse Sale (Production & Invitational) was held in Lemmon, SD with Lynn Weishaar auctioneering his first horse sale. The following year “Doc” asked John Johnson to announce the saddle horse preview. This annual sale continued for a decade.

Joe Quincy was added to the stallion roster in 1981. Larry Larson showed him as a yearling to numerous class wins, but unfortunately no points were awarded to yearlings at that time. The following year Joe Quincy went on to earn 21 halter points and multiple grands under Brad Shaw. As an older horse he made a nice calf horse. He stamped his offspring and to this day you can walk thru a horse sale and pick out his descendents by their pretty heads and swan necks – even three-and-four generations later.

In 1982 Ford Ranch held a dispersal and Kelly Cody was sold, along with Go St Blue, a AAA Son of St Bar, all the mares and colts with the exception of one mare, one colt and Joe Quincy.

Through the dispersal sale, Little Blue Lass was purchased by Ann Davies. She subsequently bred the mare to Joe Quincy producing Blueboy Quincy. Ford Ranch purchased Blueboy Quincy in 1985 from Ann as a weanling and showed him at halter as a yearling. He was a halter point earner and was Reserve Champion at the South Dakota State Fair. From then on he was used at stud and as a ranch and rodeo horse. Blueboy Quincy, like his dad Joe Quincy, left his mark on every colt he sired. You can spot them anywhere, not only are they good looking, they are top of the line ranch and rodeo horses. He was a Great Horse.

In 1991, Blueboy Quincy was sold at a dispersal sale along with all mares, weanlings, and yearlings, with the exception of one mare and one yearling.

Then in 1994, the Ford Ranch purchased some daughters of Blueboy Quincy as well as a son, Shambo Sam. “Sam” made a nice ranch and rodeo horse – very cowy. He sired heavily muscled, athletic foals that are gentle and people oriented with baby doll heads and swan necks…much like his father and grandfather.

As the years passed, we saved a few of Sam’s daughters as everyone does if they have a stud they really like. We knew we were going to have to buy a replacement. In 2005, at the Billy Myer Sale they were selling a colt by Frenchmans Guy out of Queens Coin, a AAA mare and a AAA producer, and the dam of Sissys Little Coin, the leading all time futurity/derby money earner. We were unable to go to the sale, but the next year they were selling a full brother, Guys Gold Coin, so we went to look. We really liked him and were able to buy him. When we got him home he proved to be very gentle and a people person horse. He remains so to this day. He loves attention. Our friend and trainer, Chuck Christman, broke him to ride. He was gentle, kind and took his leads naturally. We trained him to the phantom at two and have been breeding him AI since then. When he was three we knew he would be gone his 4 year old year to barrel race.

In 2009 we sold Shambo Sam. It was really difficult to do, but he went to a good home. He sired a lot of outstanding performance horses.

At the Myer sale in 2009, Charolette found a buckskin yearling we both really liked, First Down Frenchman. Again, he had an outstanding Mother, Evening Traffic, a AAAT mare and AAA producer, daughter of the All American Winner, Dash Thru Traffic, by First Down Dash. We trained him to the phantom at 2 and have been breeding him AI since then. He is broke to ride and is proving to be a tremendous athlete.

Guys Gold Coin ran successfully his futurity year (ridden by Hallie Melvin). He is a Futurity Champion, winning the Dash and Dance Futurity in 2010, a top 10 finalist many times, and a multiple 1D winner in several large open barrel races.

First Down Frenchman is a full brother to Frenchmans Traffic, a Reserve World Champion Pole Bending horse, and Traffic Guy, ridden by Tammy Fisher to win the 2012 WPRA Finals. Traffic Guy is also running successfully in PRCA Rodeos.

We are very pleased with their colts, they are attractive, lots of color, gentle to work with and very athletic. They have a strong resemblance and are difficult to tell their daddy by looks. Guys Gold Coin’s oldest will be 4 in 2013 and some are already in barrel training and appear very promising. We have their colts in Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Minnesota, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida, Texas, Nevada, South Carolina, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Michigan and Colorado.